Law Career Options – Best Actions for Great Decisions

Are you thinking about working legal services but still wondering what law career suits you best? Are you a graduate of another field of decide to shift your career in later life to get into law school? What career path are you seeking for full satisfaction?

The field of law, like any other fields, offers a lot of career options that will not make you stuck in the office or in a firm handling almost the same case every year. You will not just also end up as a barrister or a solicitor. You have a lot of options to choose from, it is important to focus on your interests, and passions before you decide which law career choice are you planning to excel on.

Here are the various career options or areas of expertise that you can dwell on to match your goals and natural passions.

1. Public Service

If you are a lawyer who got much interest in serving the public and taking various administrative roles, you can apply to any federal or state public service providers. This sector offers a great opportunity for a lawyer with a heart for public service to administer public legal work as either a project manager or a policy officer.

2. Business Sector

The field of business also needs lawyers who can help them with the complexities of legal issues in the business context. Big companies and international businesses hire their own company lawyers to attend to their business legal standards and processes to meet government demands for the continued growth.

Corporate lawyers and in-house lawyers are greatly in demand these days with the rise of international businesses and huge companies worldwide. Career choices in the business sector are in the field of telecommunications, energy, mining, banking and other private roles that in-house lawyers take within a company.

3. Legal Research

You may be a type of lawyer who is not accustomed to sit in the office or a firm handling lots of paper works and other professional responsibilities in a regular office setting. You could be a smart adventurous lawyer who loves exciting challenges all he time for more action and satisfaction in the legal context, a legal research position is what you exactly need to jam into.

4. Non-government Organizations

This is commonly known as NGO. The scopes of these organizations are the charitable institutions, advocacy bodies, social service agencies and humanitarian organizations. They always seek for lawyers who naturally show sincere interests in this nature of work.

5. Law Enforcement Sector

You do not have to be a police officer to join such famous groups as the CIA, FBI, and the Secret Service or in any other law enforcement agency. These major law enforcement bodies employ lawyers to handle some complex legal issues that are covered by the state or the federal government.

The lists are almost endless. The law enforcement and business sectors usually offer higher compensations and benefits. Most of these law career fields even include various insurances, paid leave or vacation advantages, special options for early retirement and other valuable packages. The key factor to consider here is not the salary or benefits but your individual choice and preferences that will truly make you happy and satisfied in your chosen career.

What You Need to Know About a Career As a Paralegal

A paralegal is in many respects a highly trained lawyer’s assistant that has a strong background in working within the legal system. There job is to perform many of the tasks a regular lawyer would do however paralegals are not authorised to give legal advice. This means that much of the lime light is on the lawyer which is what attracts some people to becoming a paralegal.

If, like many, you are looking to get into a career as a paralegal then there are number of things you may want to consider. The first and foremost is the type of work you will be expected to carry out. Lawyers depend on their paralegals to manage a range of activities for their clients including account management. On the other side paralegals can also be asked to perform case investigations and witness interviews under the instructions of a lawyer. This is a part of the job that excites many.

Paralegal jobs also offer a great opportunity for people who are looking to develop their legal skills on streamlining procedures for cases. This skill is one of the things law firms and lawyers look for when hiring a paralegal. They are interested in people who have knowledge of various different backgrounds and who are well rounded. This provides the opportunity for paralegals to work in a range of areas and provides diversity to the job role.

Although paralegal jobs are highly sort after working hours can be long and unsociable. Deadlines are often tight however the salaries are high in this sector and paralegals are highly regarded within society. The varied work and flexible working options are also highly attractive. For example the government is often looking to use freelance paralegals and your options after a career as a paralegal are very strong.

As with any role there are a number of core skills you are required to possess to become a paralegal. One of the most important is good communication skills. You not only need to be able to understand the terminology but also be able to speak and write in an accurate and effective manner. Candidates also need to be proficient computer users and be able to work well with others. As a result a great level of training is required and a degree at a well established university.

These are some of the fundamentals you may want to look at when thinking about a career as a paralegal. It is also worth noting that you will need to continually update your skills and is a job that is more suited to some than others. Having said this it is one that is highly rewarding and provides plenty of challenges for driven individuals

If a paralegal job isn’t for you then you might want to consider the one of many different types of legal careers. This ranges from everything from clerk to high power lawyer with each presenting their own opportunities. Whichever you decide the legal sector is an exciting sector to work within and is thriving in the UK.

The Passive Career

More than just about anybody, professional service providers understand the value of time. For them, time is literally money. Doctors, lawyers, accountants, dentists, engineers, and anyone else with specialized training who provides specialized services, bill for their time. But when you think about it, if you are an employee of a company you also bill for your time. By agreement, you work a set number of hours every week and in return receive a paycheck. If you simply stop showing up for work or miss an inordinate number of days, you will not be paid for that time.

For this reason, any person who trades their time for money faces an irrefutable limitation on what they can earn. The great paradox of time hems them in-they never have enough time and yet they have all the time that there is. It is clear that trading time for money by definition limits the amount of money an individual can earn in their career or their job. This is why many salaried employees and professional service providers create a passive career to augment their income.

A passive career is based on the creation of a stream of passive recurring income. Just as the name implies, passive recurring income is a steady stream of cash flowing into a person’s life without the direct involvement of the person in the process. Sometimes called residual income, after a passive recurring income stream has been initiated, it can literally run forever. The benefits for this type of income augmentation are clear because there are no limitations as to how much an individual can earn. In the early days of a profitable passive recurring income stream, people often continue to work at their primary job or career as well. But over time as a passive recurring income stream increases in value, many individuals simply leave their job or primary career.

One of the best ways today to launch a passive recurring stream of residual income is through an Internet marketing business. An online direct sales enterprise can be run from the comfort of your own home, and can be launched with a modest investment of both time and money. Moreover, you can find opportunities that provide a turnkey approach to such a business, combined with hands-on training and support as well.

Don’t confuse these legitimate opportunities with the get-rich-quick scams that proliferate online. Initiating a passive stream of recurring income takes time, energy, and a capital investment. But once it is started, it will run as long as you want it to.

Understanding Your Personality And The Right Career Path

Your personality greatly affects your performance in a given career. Studies show that 90% of people get into the wrong careers as they don’t know their personalities. This results to most people living unfulfilled lives. Others choose to leave their careers and venture into other areas. To increase your chances of being successful and enjoy what you do you need to join the right career path from the start.

Types of personalities

While we may appear similar on the outside, we are very different. How we act and carry ourselves is greatly determined by out personalities. The different types of personalities include:

Introverts: These are the quiet people. They love working alone or in small groups. When working, they prefer working at a more deliberate pace and love focusing on one task at a time.

Extroverts: They are the exact opposites of introverts. They are often people of high energy, love engaging in a variety of tasks and work at a quick pace. They are highly effective at multitasking.

Thinkers: These highly rely on logical analysis of situations. Before they make a decision, they have to weigh the pros and cons of everything that they do. They value fairness, honesty, and consistency.

Sensors: They are said to be realistic people as they focus on facts and details. They also apply common sense and get insight from past experiences for them to come up with practical solutions to the problems at hand.

Feelers: From their name, feelers are people that highly rely on their feelings for them to make a decision. They are highly sensitive and decide things depending on their values and how their actions will affect other people.

Intuitive: These people focus on the possibilities and the big picture. They value innovation, easily see patterns and when they are solving problems, they don’t rely on the already established solutions-they come up with their own creative ways of solving the problem.

Perceivers: They prefer keeping the options open and love acting spontaneously. They love being flexible when they are making their plans and decisions.

Judgers: Judgers are highly organized people that like sticking to plans. They are usually very good at following rules.

Best careers for the different personalities

According to experts, there is no one with only one personality; all of us are a combination of different personalities but there is always one personality that is more dominant than the others. Different personality combinations are ideal for different careers. Extroverts, sensors, thinkers, and judgers make good pharmacists, judges, project managers, insurance sales agents, and lawyers. Introverts, sensors, thinkers and perceivers can make good pilots, economists, emergency room physicians, data analysts, and civil engineers.

Introverts, intuitive, feelers and perceivers are sensitive people who are motivated by their personal values. These attributes make them great physical therapists, graphic designers, writers, psychologists, and trainers. Extroverts, intuitive, perceivers and thinkers make excellent entrepreneurs, real estate developers, marketing directors, politicians, and creative directors.

Conclusion

Your personality has a great impact on your success in your career but this doesn’t mean that you will be a failure if you choose a career that doesn’t complement your personality. If you work hard and you love what you do you will definitely be a success.

The Lawyers’ Guild Meets The Modern Age

It has become a cliche to say that we live in a globalized economy. But that doesn’t make it true – at least not for all of us.

For instance, the legal profession still operates in some respects as though we live in the 19th century, when new practitioners hung their shingles after merely “reading the law,” and judges and counselors alike served rural America by “riding the circuit.”

Granted, we do not have self-taught lawyers anymore – though the Internet may eventually change that. And only one state, Wisconsin, retains the diploma privilege, in which graduates of the state’s two accredited law schools are eligible for admission to the bar without first having to pass the much-feared bar examination.

But in most states, the legal profession still operates more like a preindustrial guild than a postindustrial industry. As an example, only lawyers are allowed to own law firms, on the dubious theory that outsiders’ capital, and the resulting increase in competition, would compromise the interests of clients. And individual lawyers may ply their trade only in states where they have secured individually state-issued licenses, though there are special provisions in which a court can grant limited permission for an out-of-stater to appear in a particular case.

Historically, each state has tied its licensing to its own individual bar exam. A lawyer wishing to relocate or to practice across state lines had to sit for multiple examinations in order to do so, except in cases where two states granted some form of reciprocity. Taking a new test requires not only a significant investment of time, but also significant additional fees.

That arrangement is slowly beginning to change, however.

Given the large body of federal law that applies in many situations, along with the large and growing body of uniform state laws that are based on a model statute and often adopted by state legislatures with little change, a national law credential would make a lot of sense. Unfortunately, it doesn’t exist. Nor is one on the horizon.

But the next best thing is a uniform national bar exam. That does exist, and New York recently announced plans to become the 16th, and so far the largest, state to implement it as of next year.

The test, called the Uniform Bar Examination, includes questions about general principles of law, along with six essay questions and two “skill tasks,” such as drafting a client letter or creating a memorandum. In New York, students will also have to pass a shorter multiple-choice exam with questions specific to New York state.

The major advantage of the Uniform Bar Exam for test-takers is that the score can be transferred across jurisdictions. So in the future, a lawyer who passes the bar in New York and who later relocates to Seattle can have her official transcript sent to Washington; if she meets Washington’s criteria, she can simply fulfill a few requirements instead of sitting for the entire test again. The more states that adopt the standardized test, the more attractive it will become.

The three states with larger populations than New York – California, Texas and Florida – do not offer the Uniform Bar Examination so far. Nor does Delaware, a state whose legal influence is outsize relative to its population because the state is home to many corporations. (Delaware lawyers do very well by this fact.) But many hope that New York’s adoption of the test may push other big states in that direction.

New York’s move has very little to do with serving the interests of the broader public. It has a lot to do with serving the interests of the state’s law schools, who – like everybody else these days – struggle to fill their classes. Jonathan Lippman, the chief judge of New York State, made this clear when discussing his decision to adopt the Uniform Bar Exam. “Law school enrollment for first-year students has declined 30 percent in the past four years,” he said, “and is at the lowest level since 1973.” (1) New York’s law schools would love to attract candidates who ultimately hope to practice elsewhere, where prospects for economic growth are better.

But just because New York is thinking of its schools and not its populace as such doesn’t mean this isn’t a useful step. Young Americans are no longer likely to spend their entire working careers in states where they grow up or go to school. Nor are they well-served by having their professional practice limited to just one state. A universal bar exam would recognize this new reality.

The legal profession remains about as far from the globalized world as young Abe Lincoln was from the jet age. The trend toward the Uniform Bar Examination is at least a small step in the right direction. It is also a sign that the people who set the rules for the legal community may have at least a vague awareness of the world around them.

Source:

1) Brooklyn Daily Eagle, “Brooklyn Law School dean reflects on NY adoption of uniform bar exam”