Do You Have What It Takes To Become A Lawyer?

Just ask a group of kids about what they want to be when they grow up, and most of them will either say a doctor, a teacher, a fireman or a chef. Occasionally though, you will find kids who will want to become a lawyer and would choose that career either because they would like to help somebody, or because they think of the money, but just what does it take to become a lawyer?

Ask many of the lawyers in good standing about why they became a lawyer, and the same reasons will be given, some started studying this career out of idealism, while others felt it would be a great career with many financial prospects. Either way, the road to becoming a good lawyer who is making a good living, is paved with many thousands of hours of studying and taking many exams in order to finally get to your goal, so you must be really sure that you have what it takes to pull it off. Are you the kind of person that is tenacious and will stick with things until you reach your goal?

You will first need your basic education, meaning finishing your college degree and go to law school for three years. After finishing law school successfully, you will be obligated to pass your bar examination in the state where you want to start practicing law. Passing the bar examination is no small achievement regardless of where you take the exam. We all can remember the record of hapless John Kennedy Jr who took the exam three times before finally passing.

Passing that examination, you are now eligible to become a member of your state bar and remain in good standing. However, if you think your study hours are over, you are mistaken. In order to remain in good standing with the state Bar Association, you will need to pass evaluations every year and follow a certain amount of course, studying new laws and material, in order to stay on top of any new developments in your field of expertise.

If you dream of life as a successful lawyer, litigating in court every day, you might want to reconsider picking this as a career. The truth of the matter is that most lawyers end up spending most of their time working in their office or law libraries, preparing their cases and doing all the investigation needed in order to find loopholes in the law, relevant rulings from the past, or any other material that can help their clients to their favor.

In fact, in actuality, it can be a long time between court dates when you actually get to strut your stuff in front of juries and judges. There are many areas of the law where court appearances are almost non-existent. Patent and some real estate attorneys rarely see the inside of a court room.

All in all, being a lawyer can be a really tough career with a lot of stress, which is why it is also one of the highest paid careers of all.

Why Nursing is the Best Career Choice

Are you finishing high school soon? Having trouble what career you want to do? If you do, then you should consider nursing as one of your career choices.

Nursing is a job that involves caring for sick and injured people. Nurses also help to treat and diagnose patients in which no other health professional is available. It is an exciting career in which sadly not enough people choose as their primary career choice. Here are 7 reasons why nursing is the best career choice for people leaving high school.

1. There is always a job available for nurses

Unlike other professions, there is always a need for nurses. From aged care nursing homes to private medical practices and to the big general hospitals, there is a big need for nurses everywhere in the country. If you need to move interstate for family reasons, then it is easy to get a job local to that area. Nursing has the best job mobility than any other profession.

2. Recession proof

In times of financial meltdowns or political conflicts, there is always a job available for nurses. It is one of the safest careers, and you will never fear about getting another job as a nurse.

3. Does not take long to finish a nursing degree

To get study to be a nurse only takes approximately one year. To be a qualified registered nurse only takes approximately two to three years, which gives you more medical autonomy and high financial benefits compared to being an ordinary enrolled nurse. It does not take long to be a nurse. Compared to being an accountant or a lawyer, it can take three or more years to finish. With nursing, you can achieve that in a quicker time and hence be earning money faster than other professionals.

4. Nursing allows you to specialize

With nursing, you can specialise in all sorts of different medical areas. For instance, you can be a specialist pathologist nurse looking at diseases in blood and tissue. You could also be a nurse who can diagnose and prescribe certain medication like a doctor. There are so many areas in nursing you can specialise in, you can never be bored in this profession. If you feel that you need a change of atmosphere or job, you can quickly adjust to different areas of nursing to give you a fresh occupational experience.

5. Nursing is rewarding profession

Nursing is a rewarding profession. It is a profession where you can talk to many different people from different backgrounds, class and profession. It is also a profession that can bring smiles to many hundreds of people.

Lawyers Deserve Respect Too

Recently a prominent female Philadelphia lawyer was quoted in a newspaper article about an equal pay settlement she had reached with her former law firm, stating that she would never encourage her daughter to become a lawyer. Her opinion surprised me because her career was commendable and encompassed practicing with a large national law firm, having a top position as a lawyer in local government, and starting and operating her own law firm. I don’t agree that law is a poor career choice for women, but it is definitely a difficult career which requires working long hours, suffering frequent stress, and sometimes receiving little gratitude from the very people lawyers try to help. As a result, it is important for lawyers to develop thick skins in order to receive the most job satisfaction from practicing law.

There are many areas of legal practice, and not all of them involve dealing with the general public and/or regularly appearing before courts and legal forums. Often the stress of law involves being expected to bill a certain number of billable hours. Depending on one’s area(s) of practice, there are two primary means in which lawyers receive payment. They either bill in increments of an hour at an hourly rate, or if there is a contingency fee agreement, they collect their fees at the end of a case, it is tried or won in court. Sometimes there is a hybrid arrangement, which is the combination of the above two kinds of billing.

I have retained and paid lawyers for legal matters, so I am in the same position as my clients, but I respect lawyers, even if I wasn’t thrilled with the results, or I wasn’t pleased that I had to hire lawyers, because I felt the lawyers provided me with the best service they could. LET ME BE CLEAR-VERY FEW PEOPLE ARE HAPPY TO PAY THEIR LAWYERS. But, lawyers have to work within the legal system, which makes many demands on them. Although I respect lawyers, that respect is often lacking in others. Most lawyers have been on the receiving end of comments from former, current and potential clients which are rude, obnoxious and abusive. I can’t think of any other profession whose members have to endure this type of behavior. This abuse generally arises because: 1) the client is not happy with their situation or the legal process, and takes it out on the lawyer; or 2) the client is trying to avoid paying their bill and comes up with every excuse under the book to avoid payment.

For some reason clients forget or ignore that law firms are businesses, and not charities. I would love to be able to call the IRS and all of my creditors and tell them that as they obviously have a lot more money than me, so they should waive what I owe them. Of course this is ridiculous, yet it is a request I hear every so often after the client has exceeded their retainer and requests or requires additional services. Recently a client stated that it was not Godly and moral for me to request payment, after owing us an amount for years, because she allegedly can’t afford it. Although we are often willing to work within a client’s budget, our bills must be paid. We have salaries and bills to pay, an office building to maintain, and we also support other businesses whose services we use for supplies and various reasons. It is not fair not when clients ask us to feel their pain, but they don’t feel they have to treat us fairly.

Here are common questions clients have about bills:

1.) Clients sometimes express surprise that lawyers charge for phone calls and e mails on hourly rate cases, although this occupies a large part of their day. With the advent of e mail, clients often send many e mails a day and expect a quick response. Our fee agreements clearly states that we bill for these services. Let’s see how it works out if we didn’t charge for this time. As an example, let’s say there are 7 billable hours in a day (although my days are far longer), or 420 minutes. If I spend time on behalf of 15 current clients for e mails, or I spend time on calls with or regarding them, and I spend an average of 12 minutes on each call or e mail, that is 180 minutes or 3 hours. If 15 potential clients call or e mail me and I spend an average of 6 minutes speaking with them, that is another, 1½ hours or 90 minutes. That leaves 150 minutes or 2½ hours for me to attend meetings with other lawyers, clients or staff, or dealing with correspondence or legal documents. Using my $280 billable hourly rate for 2013 (which, by the way, is far too low based on my level of experience), and I don’t charge for the 3 hours above, I am losing potential fees of $840 a day, or $4,200 a week, or $210,000 a year. I would never ask my clients or any other professionals to work 3 hours a day for free.

People don’t often realize that lawyers, including me, contribute a great deal of unpaid time as they don’t charge for every minute of their time, they try and counsel people who aren’t certain how to deal with the legal system for free, and they often do some firm of pro bono work. WE NOT ONLY DESERVE SOME RESPECT, WE DESERVE A LOT OF RESPECT!

What It Takes to Succeed in the Legal Career

Legal careers and legal jobs are becoming one of the most dynamic and rewarding career choice; as our legal system has become an integral part of our daily lives. Either minor or major, we need legal expertise and guidance for every right that we possess.

We live in an information age, where people are aware of their fundamental rights and duties, so lawyers and other legal professionals must know how to have success for a client. A meaningful law career that solves client’s needs, leads not only to career satisfaction and a sense of achievement; but, it also can result in a high income earning potential.

More and more bright young aspirants are considering law as their prime career choice to become as successful as the lawyers and professionals they idolize. But not all who begin with high hopes succeed. So, what could be the most important qualities to obtain success in a legal career and the legal profession?

In his book, The Science of Getting Rich, Wallace Wattles notes that those who “thinks in a certain way” will succeed pure and simple. Hence, let’s take a look at the things that successful legal professionals embrace. If you do these things in that same way that the successful legal practitioner does, you will, in fact, succeed. Here, then, are a few ingredients that will lead to success in any legal job:

  • Communication: A legal professional is bound to have exemplary communication skills. Communication skills cover your written, oral and listening skills. In the legal profession one has to interview suspects, witnesses, clients and all sorts of people in order to extract any and all information associated to their case; not only that but he also needs to analyze that information on various fronts to verify the veracity of the information received. Therefore, working and improving upon your communication and listening skills is essential to your success in a legal career. Any seminars, books or training devoted to increasing your communication abilities will inevitably lead to success.
  • Empathic and Rational: Being empathic in the legal profession means the capacity to understand and know emotionally what a client has experienced and the ability to put oneself in clients’ shoes. Note I did not say to be sympathetic. Sympathetic means you feel sorry for your client. Empathy involves the quality of appreciating your client’s situation. At the same time a legal professional should have a rational mind and clear thinking, because as my mother used to say “rule your life with reason.”
  • Out of the Box thinking: Legal professionals must have the ability to find what is hidden and present the best choices for their clients. Typically, clients are in conflict with an adversary. The creative legal professional can break deadlocks through creative solutions that lead to mutually beneficial solutions
  • Specialized Knowledge: One needs to have expert knowledge in their area to work in any profession, but in this is especially so in the legal profession. The top legal professional must not only master the legal knowledge of the sector he represents but also he must gain the knowledge vital to the industry itself. As they say – “Hundred men with guns cannot steal as much as a lawyer with his words”, so to choose the right words and phrases one must be knowledgeable. For example, if you are a litigator that represents a company in the oil industry, then you must know every detail of the oil industry to prepare a strong and winning argument for the case; similarly for any client a legal professional must have a thorough knowledge of every detail associated to a client’s work.
  • Confidentiality: Legal ethics demand strict confidentially with your client. If you cannot observe this basic cannon, then you cannot find success in the legal profession. Maintaining confidentiality is the foremost task of a legal professional. Attorneys, paralegals, legal receptionists, all gain confidential information and it must be kept secret. Violating the attorney client privilege is tantamount to losing a client’s faith, which can be fatal in any legal position.
  • Commitment: There is a saying that “A Lawyer would do anything to win a case.” Commitment is required in any and every legal profession. Fighting a case for a client is like treating a patient; clients in the legal world have just one expectation of ‘success’ and to fulfill it, one must be committed to his work. Most of the famous and highly reputed people in legal careers forget about everything else, sometimes they overlook their personal commitments; it’s just 40% what they work at officially and 60% of the unofficial work that makes the difference. Success in the legal profession requires preparation-a lot of time in research and drawing up all the necessary documents. Perseverance is the key; one must be willing to work without any boundaries to time in a legal job.
  • Diplomatic: It is said rightly that “He is not a lawyer who can’t take two sides”. There are no friends or foes in legal profession; one must say the right words at the right place and the right time. Being diplomatic makes your overall personality favorable, even for those who disagree as to what you say or believe; also, it makes you a good negotiator, which is a routine task in any legal profession. You should be diplomatic if you are trying to find success in legal careers.
  • Persuasive: Whether a lawyer, attorney, paralegal or a legal assistant everyone in legal the profession should be persuasive. It requires a great amount of skill and practice to persuade a judge, jury or even client to your position. Every client expects their legal consultant to be aggressive, they do not pay you to sleep and be shy; you must learn to persuade to get success in legal careers.
  • Patience: You need to be patient in order to be successful in legal profession. If you don’t succeed at first, try again; you will not get your way the first time around. You will need to write letter after letter, draft motion after motion, in order to succeed for your clients. Practicing a legal job requires a lot of waiting. Waiting around courthouses for your case to be called. Waiting around for decisions on appeals to be handed down. It is said rightly that – “If you are a legal professional, either you will learn to wait or you will simply grow old before time.”
  • Last, but not the least, Love of argument: Legal professionals debate constantly; with courts, with adversaries, with companies and even with their own clients and associates. If you love to advance your position, not just occasionally or at work but day in and day out, and if you are difficult to beat in arguments; then you definitely have what it takes to excel in legal careers.

The Nursing Career

Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families and communities to meet again, achieve and maintain optimal health and functioning. Modern definitions of nursing define it as a science and an art that focuses on promoting quality of life as defined by individuals and families, throughout their life experiences from birth to care at the end of life.

In pre-modern times, nuns and the military often nursing services. The religious and military roots of modern nursing remain in evidence today. For example, in Britain, senior nurses are known as “Sisters”. In recent times in the U.S. Canada and many nurses are flowing back to work in a “religious” on the ground across the “Parish Nursing.” These nurses work within a church community to carry out health education, counseling, referrals to provide community support agencies, and connect volunteers from the Christian community with those in need of assistance.

Nurses recognize that the nursing profession is an essential part of society which has grown. The authority to practice nursing in basa is a social contract that defines the rights and professional responsibilities, as well as mechanisms for public accountability. The practice of nursing comprises an altruistic behavior, is guided by research and nursing is governed by a code of ethics.

Nursing continues to develop a broad range of knowledge and skills associated. There are a number of educational paths to become a professional nurse, but all involve extensive study of nursing theory and practice and training in clinical skills.

In almost all countries, nursing practice is defined and regulated by law and entry into the profession is regulated by national, state or territorial boards of nursing.

The American Nurses’ Association (1980) has identified nursing as “the diagnosis and treatment of human responses to actual or potential health problems.” Just as medical diagnoses help in the planning, implementation and evaluation of health care, nursing diagnoses help in the planning, implementation and evaluation of nursing care.

Like other disciplines maturation, nursing has developed various theories that fit the differences and philosophical beliefs or paradigms of the world. Nursing theories nurses to help direct its activities to achieve specific goals with people. Nursing is a knowledge-based discipline committed to the betterment of mankind. Nursing has not only become a profession, but also an art.

Nursing is the most diverse of all health professions. It is a universal role that appears in some form in all cultures.

Nursing can be divided into different specialties or ratings. In the U.S., there are a large number of nursing specialties. Professional organizations or certification boards issue of voluntary certification in many of these areas.

These specialties include attention throughout human life based on the patient’s needs. Many nurses who choose a specialty become certified in that area, which means they possess expert knowledge of specialty. There are over 200 nursing specialties and sub-specialties. Certified nurses often earn a salary differential over their non-certified colleagues, and studies of the Institute of Medicine have shown that specialty certified nurses have higher rates of patient satisfaction and lower rates of work-related errors in patient care.

Nurses in practice a wide range of environments from hospitals to people who visit in their homes and take care of them in schools for research in pharmaceutical companies. Nurses working in shaping health (also called industrial health), free standing clinics and medical offices, nurse management clinics, long-term care, and camps. Nurses working on cruise ships and in military service. They act as advisers and consultants to health care and insurance industries. Some nurses are working with lawyers and other lawyers as legal nurse consultants, reviewing patient records to ensure that adequate attention and gave testimony in court. In many cities, nurses can even enter their names on a “record” and work a variety of temporary jobs.

In the modern world, there are a large number of nursing specialties:
Ambulatory Care Nursing
Advanced nursing practice
Behavioral health nursing
Camp nurses
Cardiac nursing
Cardiac catheter laboratory nursing
The case management
Clinical nurse specialist
Clinical research nurse
Nursing in community health
Correctional nursing
Nursing critical care
Developmental disabilities nursing
District nursing
Emergency nursing
Environmental Health Nursing
Flight nursing
Forensic nursing
Gastroenterology Nursing
Genetics nursing
Geriatric Nursing
Health visit
Hematology oncology nursing
HIV / AIDS nursing
Home health nursing
Hospice nurses
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy Nursing
Intavenous therapy nursing
Infectious diseases nursing
Legal nursing
Legal nurse researcher
Maternal-Child Nursing
Medical-Surgical Nursing
Military and uniformed nursing services, including Public Health Service
Neonatal Nursing
Neuro-surgical nursing
Nurse anesthetist
Nurse-midwife
Nurse professional
Nursing educator
Nursing Informatics
Nursing Management
Obstetrics, Gynecology nursing
From health nursing
Nursing oncological
Operating Theatre nursing
Orthopaedic nursing
Ostomy nursing
The pain management and palliative care nursing
Pediatric Nursing
Perianesthesia Nursing
Perioperative Nursing
Plastic and reconstructive surgical nursing
Private Nursing
Psychiatric nursing or mental health
Public health
Pulmonary nursing
Improving the quality
Radiology nursing
Rehabilitation nursing
Nursing kidney dialysis
Renal nursing
Research
School of Nursing
Sub-acute nursing
Substance abuse nursing
Tele-medicine nursing
Telemetry Nursing
Telephone triage nurses
Transplant nursing
Travel Nursing
Urology nursing
Utilization Management
The wound care
Professional organizations or certification boards issue of voluntary certification in many of these specialties.

Assistant Nursing skills are all learned tasks used to help residents or patients with activities of daily living (ADLs) and providing bedside care, including basic nursing procedures under the supervision of a registered nurse ( RN) or licensed practical nurse (LPN).

At present, hospitals and extended care facillities an assistant nurse is an important part of a medical team that includes staff outside many of the nurses. In the quest to earn a profit of care many hospitals in the United States have reduced their nurse to patient ratios, which requires a nurse to care for as many as twelve or fourteen patients at once. To that good attention being given to patients that a nurse assistant is needed to provide routine care so that nurses can focus on tasks that only he / she can do, such as care plans, evaluations of nursing, administration of medications, and help surgery preparation room. The auxiliary nurse should not only be highly skilled in the current procedures being carried out, but must also be able to make quick observations of the patient’s condition and information to report to the nurse. Since the nurse can not spend large amounts of time in a room with the patient, the nurse assistant is known as the nurse “eyes and ears”.

A nurse assistant must have a solid understanding of emergency procedures and be able to stay calm in stressful situations. They should be able to introduce a Code Blue and be well drilled in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.