The Passive Career

More than just about anybody, professional service providers understand the value of time. For them, time is literally money. Doctors, lawyers, accountants, dentists, engineers, and anyone else with specialized training who provides specialized services, bill for their time. But when you think about it, if you are an employee of a company you also bill for your time. By agreement, you work a set number of hours every week and in return receive a paycheck. If you simply stop showing up for work or miss an inordinate number of days, you will not be paid for that time.

For this reason, any person who trades their time for money faces an irrefutable limitation on what they can earn. The great paradox of time hems them in-they never have enough time and yet they have all the time that there is. It is clear that trading time for money by definition limits the amount of money an individual can earn in their career or their job. This is why many salaried employees and professional service providers create a passive career to augment their income.

A passive career is based on the creation of a stream of passive recurring income. Just as the name implies, passive recurring income is a steady stream of cash flowing into a person’s life without the direct involvement of the person in the process. Sometimes called residual income, after a passive recurring income stream has been initiated, it can literally run forever. The benefits for this type of income augmentation are clear because there are no limitations as to how much an individual can earn. In the early days of a profitable passive recurring income stream, people often continue to work at their primary job or career as well. But over time as a passive recurring income stream increases in value, many individuals simply leave their job or primary career.

One of the best ways today to launch a passive recurring stream of residual income is through an Internet marketing business. An online direct sales enterprise can be run from the comfort of your own home, and can be launched with a modest investment of both time and money. Moreover, you can find opportunities that provide a turnkey approach to such a business, combined with hands-on training and support as well.

Don’t confuse these legitimate opportunities with the get-rich-quick scams that proliferate online. Initiating a passive stream of recurring income takes time, energy, and a capital investment. But once it is started, it will run as long as you want it to.

Understanding Your Personality And The Right Career Path

Your personality greatly affects your performance in a given career. Studies show that 90% of people get into the wrong careers as they don’t know their personalities. This results to most people living unfulfilled lives. Others choose to leave their careers and venture into other areas. To increase your chances of being successful and enjoy what you do you need to join the right career path from the start.

Types of personalities

While we may appear similar on the outside, we are very different. How we act and carry ourselves is greatly determined by out personalities. The different types of personalities include:

Introverts: These are the quiet people. They love working alone or in small groups. When working, they prefer working at a more deliberate pace and love focusing on one task at a time.

Extroverts: They are the exact opposites of introverts. They are often people of high energy, love engaging in a variety of tasks and work at a quick pace. They are highly effective at multitasking.

Thinkers: These highly rely on logical analysis of situations. Before they make a decision, they have to weigh the pros and cons of everything that they do. They value fairness, honesty, and consistency.

Sensors: They are said to be realistic people as they focus on facts and details. They also apply common sense and get insight from past experiences for them to come up with practical solutions to the problems at hand.

Feelers: From their name, feelers are people that highly rely on their feelings for them to make a decision. They are highly sensitive and decide things depending on their values and how their actions will affect other people.

Intuitive: These people focus on the possibilities and the big picture. They value innovation, easily see patterns and when they are solving problems, they don’t rely on the already established solutions-they come up with their own creative ways of solving the problem.

Perceivers: They prefer keeping the options open and love acting spontaneously. They love being flexible when they are making their plans and decisions.

Judgers: Judgers are highly organized people that like sticking to plans. They are usually very good at following rules.

Best careers for the different personalities

According to experts, there is no one with only one personality; all of us are a combination of different personalities but there is always one personality that is more dominant than the others. Different personality combinations are ideal for different careers. Extroverts, sensors, thinkers, and judgers make good pharmacists, judges, project managers, insurance sales agents, and lawyers. Introverts, sensors, thinkers and perceivers can make good pilots, economists, emergency room physicians, data analysts, and civil engineers.

Introverts, intuitive, feelers and perceivers are sensitive people who are motivated by their personal values. These attributes make them great physical therapists, graphic designers, writers, psychologists, and trainers. Extroverts, intuitive, perceivers and thinkers make excellent entrepreneurs, real estate developers, marketing directors, politicians, and creative directors.

Conclusion

Your personality has a great impact on your success in your career but this doesn’t mean that you will be a failure if you choose a career that doesn’t complement your personality. If you work hard and you love what you do you will definitely be a success.

The Lawyers’ Guild Meets The Modern Age

It has become a cliche to say that we live in a globalized economy. But that doesn’t make it true – at least not for all of us.

For instance, the legal profession still operates in some respects as though we live in the 19th century, when new practitioners hung their shingles after merely “reading the law,” and judges and counselors alike served rural America by “riding the circuit.”

Granted, we do not have self-taught lawyers anymore – though the Internet may eventually change that. And only one state, Wisconsin, retains the diploma privilege, in which graduates of the state’s two accredited law schools are eligible for admission to the bar without first having to pass the much-feared bar examination.

But in most states, the legal profession still operates more like a preindustrial guild than a postindustrial industry. As an example, only lawyers are allowed to own law firms, on the dubious theory that outsiders’ capital, and the resulting increase in competition, would compromise the interests of clients. And individual lawyers may ply their trade only in states where they have secured individually state-issued licenses, though there are special provisions in which a court can grant limited permission for an out-of-stater to appear in a particular case.

Historically, each state has tied its licensing to its own individual bar exam. A lawyer wishing to relocate or to practice across state lines had to sit for multiple examinations in order to do so, except in cases where two states granted some form of reciprocity. Taking a new test requires not only a significant investment of time, but also significant additional fees.

That arrangement is slowly beginning to change, however.

Given the large body of federal law that applies in many situations, along with the large and growing body of uniform state laws that are based on a model statute and often adopted by state legislatures with little change, a national law credential would make a lot of sense. Unfortunately, it doesn’t exist. Nor is one on the horizon.

But the next best thing is a uniform national bar exam. That does exist, and New York recently announced plans to become the 16th, and so far the largest, state to implement it as of next year.

The test, called the Uniform Bar Examination, includes questions about general principles of law, along with six essay questions and two “skill tasks,” such as drafting a client letter or creating a memorandum. In New York, students will also have to pass a shorter multiple-choice exam with questions specific to New York state.

The major advantage of the Uniform Bar Exam for test-takers is that the score can be transferred across jurisdictions. So in the future, a lawyer who passes the bar in New York and who later relocates to Seattle can have her official transcript sent to Washington; if she meets Washington’s criteria, she can simply fulfill a few requirements instead of sitting for the entire test again. The more states that adopt the standardized test, the more attractive it will become.

The three states with larger populations than New York – California, Texas and Florida – do not offer the Uniform Bar Examination so far. Nor does Delaware, a state whose legal influence is outsize relative to its population because the state is home to many corporations. (Delaware lawyers do very well by this fact.) But many hope that New York’s adoption of the test may push other big states in that direction.

New York’s move has very little to do with serving the interests of the broader public. It has a lot to do with serving the interests of the state’s law schools, who – like everybody else these days – struggle to fill their classes. Jonathan Lippman, the chief judge of New York State, made this clear when discussing his decision to adopt the Uniform Bar Exam. “Law school enrollment for first-year students has declined 30 percent in the past four years,” he said, “and is at the lowest level since 1973.” (1) New York’s law schools would love to attract candidates who ultimately hope to practice elsewhere, where prospects for economic growth are better.

But just because New York is thinking of its schools and not its populace as such doesn’t mean this isn’t a useful step. Young Americans are no longer likely to spend their entire working careers in states where they grow up or go to school. Nor are they well-served by having their professional practice limited to just one state. A universal bar exam would recognize this new reality.

The legal profession remains about as far from the globalized world as young Abe Lincoln was from the jet age. The trend toward the Uniform Bar Examination is at least a small step in the right direction. It is also a sign that the people who set the rules for the legal community may have at least a vague awareness of the world around them.

Source:

1) Brooklyn Daily Eagle, “Brooklyn Law School dean reflects on NY adoption of uniform bar exam”

Career As a Lawyer

A legal system exists in every civilized society to safeguard people’s rights, interest, their life and property. To run the system successfully there needs people who can understand the laws, interpret and explain them to the common people. There comes the role of lawyers.

Career as a lawyer has always been a respectful option in the civilized societies in the world. An advocate is one who speaks on behalf of another person, especially in a legal context. He is licensed to practice law, learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; Lawyer profession involves the practical application and knowledge of acts, rules, statutes and laws of the land to solve people’s problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies significantly across legal jurisdictions.

In today’s rapidly changing world progress and development have been made almost in every profession. It results creation of large number of opportunities for individuals. Legal profession has no exception. Law jobs in Pakistan can be seen in national dailies regularly. In the legal profession, lawyers have many options over the course of their careers. Besides private practice, they can always aspire to becoming a district attorney on division level, assistant district attorney on district level. Jobs for lawyers are offered as Advocate General in the High courts and as attorney General in the Supreme Court. Many other career opportunities for lawyers are also available in legal profession like public prosecutor, government counsel, corporate in-house counsel, administrative law judge, judge, arbitrator, law professor, or politician. A large organization offers jobs as legal advisor and lucrative remuneration is offered for the job. In developing countries like India and Pakistan, a large majority of law students never actually practice, but simply use their law degree as a foundation for careers in other fields. Lawyers generally structure their legal education around their chosen specialty; the boundaries between different types of lawyers are carefully defined and hard to cross. After one earns a law degree, career mobility may be severely constrained. The legal profession is not rigorously bifurcated and everyone within it can easily change roles and arenas.

In many countries, lawyers are general practitioners who take almost any kind of case that walks in the door. In others, there has been a tendency since the start of the 20th century for lawyers to specialize early in their careers. In countries where specialization is prevalent, many lawyers specialize in representing one side in one particular area of the law.

Law on Your Terms – Become the Lawyer You Want to Be

In the macho environment of the law, to express any lack of confidence, vulnerability or self-doubt has traditionally been regarded as weakness. Many women lawyers who were regarded as reliable and 100% capable suddenly find that their commitment is challenged (through no fault of their own) when they start a family.

So, what would it take for you to become the lawyer you want to be?

Refocus on what is really important to you. Build your resilience and re-energise.

Action Steps

1. Make a list of everything that is important to you about your career. What have you achieved over the last 5 years? What are your strengths and weaknesses? How can you turn you weaknesses into strengths?
2. What would being a lawyer on your terms look like? How would your life be different? Spend 10 minutes thinking and writing down your goals – short, medium and long term
3. List all the things that are likely to block your progress
4. Separate the blocks into those that you can influence and those that you cannot
5. Decide to let go of everything out of your control
6. Concentrate and only use your energy on those things that you can influence
7. Commit to taking one small step every day towards your goals
8. Remember to be successful you need both technical and “soft skill” expertise
9. Review your progress regularly
10. Enlist the help of a mentor (inside or outside your organisation). Use them as a sounding board and cheerleader to spur you on or give you that extra boost when your confidence dips.

Use these 10 steps to become the lawyer you want to be in 2009!